May 18th, 2014
Pourquoi je te parle du suicide ? Tu sais à quel point je déteste le suicide, pour le mal qu’il fait aux autres. Ou alors il faut cacher la chose, par générosité. Pourquoi je te le dis à toi ? Parce que tu aimes le malheur. C’est un cadeau que je te fais. Bon appétit.
Albert Camus (dans les annexes du Premier Homme)
May 14th, 2014
Mirabeau, lying on his deathbed, asked his valet to masturbate him one last time (…) The point is not to die having a hard-on but to have a hard-on despite death, against death.

Pierre Zaoui, La traversée des catastrophes (my translation)
— Would Hegel’s master-slave dialectic have been changed, had he known that anecdote ?
(btw, is Fifty Shades of Grey a Sadeian interpretation of Hegel’s phrase “when philosophy paints its grey on grey…”??)

#allworkandnoplay

May 12th, 2014
you can zoom if you prefer

you can zoom if you prefer

May 3rd, 2014
C’est un bonheur que nous n’ayons pas deux mains droites. (…) Ce qu’il y a de « gauche » dans la main gauche est assurément nécessaire à une civilisation supérieure ; elle nous relie au passé vénérable de l’homme, alors qu’il n’était pas trop habile, encore loin de pouvoir faire, selon le dicton populaire, « tout ce qu’il veut de ses dix doigts ». S’il en était autrement, nous serions submergés par un affreux excès de virtuosité.
Éloge de la main, par Henri Focillon, 1934
(ça sonne un peu comme l’île des Gauchers d’A.Jardin)

(Source: classiques.uqac.ca)

May 2nd, 2014
 El sueño de la razon produce bad metaphysics  - if “sueño” means “dream” then “razon” should be translated by “vernunft” (because by definition the verstand does not produce any irrational dream: “vernunft’s dream can be described as weird pseudo-metaphysical assumptions”)
- if “sueño” means “sleep” then “razon” should be translated by “verstand” (because it’s by a lack of verstand that vernunft can go wild: “verstand’s sleep causes versnunft’s dreams”) 
NB: how does one say a “dreamless sleep” in spanish, if sueno means both?
AAAAND that’s about all for my linguistic considerations.

El sueño de la razon produce bad metaphysics
- if “sueño” means “dream” then “razon” should be translated by “vernunft” (because by definition the verstand does not produce any irrational dream: “vernunft’s dream can be described as weird pseudo-metaphysical assumptions”)
- if “sueño” means “sleep” then “razon” should be translated by “verstand” (because it’s by a lack of verstand that vernunft can go wild: “verstand’s sleep causes versnunft’s dreams”)

NB: how does one say a “dreamless sleep” in spanish, if sueno means both?
AAAAND that’s about all for my linguistic considerations.

Forgive me father…

Forgive me father…

April 30th, 2014
 Sickness and stress m^ke Lucy a sleepless girl 
(it’s a sequel of my previous post)

Sickness and stress m^ke Lucy a sleepless girl
(it’s a sequel of my previous post)

April 28th, 2014
she died from administrative problems…

she died from administrative problems…

April 25th, 2014
I don’t know if this is “realistic” or “unrealistic,” but for me, my characters are more real than real people. In those six or seven months that I’m writing, those people are inside me. It’s a kind of cosmos. (…) Please think about it this way: I have a twin brother. And when I was two years old, one of us—the other one—was kidnapped. He was brought to a faraway place and we haven’t seen each other since. I think my protagonist is him. A part of myself, but not me, and we haven’t seen each other for a long time. It’s a kind of alternative form of myself. In terms of DNA, we are the same, but our environment has been different. So our way of thinking would be different. Every time I write a book I put my feet in different shoes. Because sometimes I am tired of being myself. This way I can escape. It’s a fantasy.
Haruki Murakami

(Source: theparisreview.org)

April 23rd, 2014
Imagine all the people taking john-lennonish pictures of their nosebleed stains…Ooh ooh oohooh… You may say I’m a weirdo - but I’m not the only one !   (DIY: try sneezing while nose-bleding)

Imagine all the people taking john-lennonish pictures of their nosebleed stains…Ooh ooh oohooh… You may say I’m a weirdo - but I’m not the only one ! (DIY: try sneezing while nose-bleding)

April 22nd, 2014
Skepticism with respect to others is not a discovery but a compulsion, a nihilistic despair of the pain of acknowledging separateness.
Stanley Cavell, Cities of Words- §Gaslight, p112
April 20th, 2014

The Spinoza Problem, by Irvin Yalom : read. And…well, it left me quite indifferent. I already wanted to read Spinoza so it is merely an appetizer. It’s really quick to read, but a bit - I can’t say boring, because I would probably have enjoyed its dialogues a lot when I was younger - but predictable. (Anyway, I can criticize, but I still think it must be interesting to write such a story with a philosopher you particularly enjoy)
Has anyone read it, or another book by Yalom ? Any reading advice here ? or impression to share?

April 16th, 2014
the worker in the field of philosophy, especially pure philosophy (logic and metaphysics), must hold his object hanging in midair before him, and must always describe and examine it, not merely part by part, but within the totality of a system as well (the system of pure reason). Hence it is not surprising if metaphysicians are incapacitated sooner than scholars in other fields or in applied philosophy. (…)
Post Scriptum (…): (I lost the sight in my left eye some five years ago) (…) It is also curious that one can lose the sight in one eye without noticing it (I estimate the period, with regard to my left eye, at about three years).
Kant, The Conflict of the Faculties (end) - weirdly using this classic metaphor to describe his work of metaphysician (check out the etymology of “theory” - that’s it) while telling the reader he is left unable to see properly — It’s either a bad coincidence, either a way to professionally put one foot in the grave…
April 12th, 2014
We lived together under one roof, but my parents and sister were like strangers to me, and I had no idea what they wanted from life. And the same held true for them - they didn’t have any idea what kind of person I was or what I aspired to. Not that I knew what I wanted in life - I didn’t. I love reading novels to distraction, but didn’t write well enough to be a novelist; being an editor or a critic was out, too, since my personal tastes ran to extremes. Novels should be for pure personal enjoyment, I decided, not part of your work or study. That’s why I didn’t study literature, but history. I didn’t have any special interest in history, but once I began studying it I found it an engrossing subject. I didn’t plan to go to grad school and devote my life to history or anything, though my adviser did suggest that. I enjoyed reading and thinking, but I was hardly the academic type. As Pushkin put it: He had no itch to dig for glories / Deep in the dirt that time has laid. All of which didn’t mean I was about to find a job in a normal company, claw my way through the cut-throat competition, and advance step by step up the slippery slopes of the capitalist pyramid.
So by a process of elimination, I ended up a teacher. The school is only a few stations away by train. (…)I hadn’t planned on being a teacher, but after I actually became one I discovered a deeper respect and affection for the profession than I ever imagined I’d have. More accurately, really, I should say that I happened to discover myself.
I’d stand at the front of the classroom, teaching my primary-school charges basic facts about language, life, the world, and I’d find that at the same time I was teaching myself these basic facts all over again - filtered through the eyes and minds of these children. Done the right way, this was a refreshing experience. Profound, even. I got along well with my pupils, their mothers, and my fellow teachers.
Still the basic questions tugged at me: Who am I? What am I searching for? Where am I going?
Haruki Murakami, Sputnik Sweetheart

Etymological ponderation while taking an hour-long bath:

The word "phrase", when used in english, means the same as the word "sentence" used in french. (a proverbial expression)
The word "phrase", when used in french, means the same as the word "sentence" used in english. (a set of words complete in itself)

And I presume I’ll never figure out why this etymological chiasmus…